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Re: Big Picture

From: "paul butler" <paul(at)entropia(dot)co(dot)uk>
To: pgsql-novice(at)postgresql(dot)org
Subject: Re: Big Picture
Date: 2002-10-22 10:33:48
Message-ID: T5e184870e6ac1785ed21a@pcow035o.blueyonder.co.uk (view raw or flat)
Thread:
Lists: pgsql-novice
Date sent:      	Tue, 22 Oct 2002 05:51:42 -0400
Subject:        	Re: [NOVICE] Big Picture
From:           	Erik Price <erikprice(at)mac(dot)com>
To:             	pgsql-novice(at)postgresql(dot)org

On my cursory reading of Fabien Pascal on dbdebunk.com (which 
is both refreshing and entertaining and reccommended), he seems 
to emphasise the need to separate the application from the 
application's data requirements. Get the data model right and then 
look hard at how the application might best be implemented.

 Many rdbms' have a layer (in pg, rules, triggers, plsql etc) which 
have the potential to support an applications functional 
requirements, and rdbms' have traditionally wrestled with the 
eternal problems of concurrency and consistency and are therefore 
well suited to handle these issues.

I'm not sure sql is the place to handle application logic as a rule 
though. I would tend to put as much control as possible within the 
database, but no more. 

The old fashioned idea of three tier applications, database, logic 
and presentation has much to commend it as a guide. Using each 
layer as intended will maximise the utility and flexibility of the 
entire application. All easier said than done, of course and it will 
always come down to the developer's judgement.
Just mt opinion of course

Cheers

Paul Butler
> 
> On Tuesday, October 22, 2002, at 03:08  AM, Joel Rodrigues wrote:
> 
> > Or, if one were looking for childishly (in programming terms) easy, 
> > instant/simultaneous web gratification, try putting as much of your 
> > application logic into SQL, use Python CGI scripting, and use a web 
> > browser interface. So simple.
> 
> Is "putting as much of your application logic into SQL" the preferred 
> way to develop DB-driven applications?  I ask this because the only 
> database I've used is MySQL, which I enjoyed learning about and using 
> but required me to implement a lot of the DB logic in my application 
> code.  (It was a PHP app.)  That's why I want to try PostgreSQL, to get 
> more experience with writing logic into the database itself.  But I was 
> curious if there are any resources that discuss why this methodology is 
> preferrable if indeed it is.
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Erik
> 
> PS:  I agree that Python is a great language!
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Erik Price                                   (zombies roam)
> 
> email: erikprice(at)mac(dot)com
> jabber: erikprice(at)jabber(dot)org
> 
> 
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