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Re: Pg on SMP half-powered

From: Víctor Romero <romero(at)kde(dot)org>
To: <pgsql-hackers(at)postgresql(dot)org>
Subject: Re: Pg on SMP half-powered
Date: 2001-07-06 08:52:33
Message-ID: 200107061059.f66AxgI16419@programasdefuturo.com (view raw or flat)
Thread:
Lists: pgsql-hackers
El Jueves 05 Julio 2001 19:34, The Hermit Hacker escribió:
> What is the postgres process doing?  what does iostat show for disk I/O?
> from reading this, you are comparing apples->oranges ... are the drives
> the same on the non-SMP as the SMP?  amount of RAM?  speed of CPUs?  hard
> drive controllers with same amount of cache on them? etc, etc, etc ...

	The postgres is doing inserts, but it does not matter. Other tests and 
benchs do the same weird results. All the process stay the most of the time 
sleeping.

	The disk of the non-SMP is a cheap IDE. The disk of the SMP is a SCSI-2 
disk. Bonnie and other benchs give to the SMP machine better results (that is 
evident). Thay is what does strange that postgres run fater on the non-SMP 
machine.

	(about comparing apples with oranges) Yes, I know. More exactly, I am 
comparing a F-1 car with a bike, bike run faster, and I ask on the F-1 
experts mailing list why.

 	RAM: 1Gb on the SMP machine. 128Mb on the non-SMP machine.

 	Speed: 400MHz on the non-SMP machine. 550 on the SMP one.

           The SMP machine is far away better than the non-SMP one. Same OS, 
same distro, same Postgres, same test, and a cheap non-SMP machine 
outperforms a very expensive HP SMP server. It looks a interblocking stuff, 
due to all the postmasters are sleeping but one, meanwhile on the non-SMP 
they runs concurently. Does anybody knows what is happening?


 Yours:

 

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