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Re: Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy

From: "George Sexton" <georges(at)mhsoftware(dot)com>
To: <pgsql-performance(at)postgresql(dot)org>
Subject: Re: Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy
Date: 2010-02-24 22:00:09
Message-ID: 005d01cab59c$bbdeb1e0$339c15a0$@com (view raw or flat)
Thread:
Lists: pgsql-performance
I missed something:

select 
	B.City,
	MaxCityTemp.Temp,
	min(B.Date) as FirstMaxDate
from bar b 
	INNER JOIN (select city,max(temp) as Temp from Bar group by City) as
MaxCityTemp
	ON B.City=MaxCityTemp.City AND B.Temp=MaxCityTemp.Temp
Group by
	B.City,
	MaxCityTemp.Temp

George Sexton
MH Software, Inc.
http://www.mhsoftware.com/
Voice: 303 438 9585
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: pgsql-performance-owner(at)postgresql(dot)org [mailto:pgsql-performance-
> owner(at)postgresql(dot)org] On Behalf Of George Sexton
> Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2010 2:58 PM
> To: pgsql-performance(at)postgresql(dot)org
> Subject: Re: [PERFORM] Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy
> 
> You could do:
> 
> select
> 	B.City,
> 	MaxCityTemp.Temp,
> 	min(B.Date) as FirstMaxDate
> from bar b
> 	INNER JOIN (select city,max(temp) as Temp from Bar group by City)
> as
> MaxCityTemp
> 	ON B.City=MaxCityTemp.City
> Group by
> 	B.City,
> 	MaxCityTemp.Temp
> 
> George Sexton
> MH Software, Inc.
> http://www.mhsoftware.com/
> Voice: 303 438 9585
> 
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: pgsql-performance-owner(at)postgresql(dot)org [mailto:pgsql-
> performance-
> > owner(at)postgresql(dot)org] On Behalf Of Dave Crooke
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2010 2:31 PM
> > To: pgsql-performance
> > Subject: [PERFORM] Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy
> >
> > This is a generic SQL issue and not PG specific, but I'd like to get
> > an opinion from this list.
> >
> > Consider the following data:
> >
> > # \d bar
> >                 Table "public.bar"
> >  Column |            Type             | Modifiers
> > --------+-----------------------------+-----------
> >  city   | character varying(255)      |
> >  temp   | integer                     |
> >  date   | timestamp without time zone |
> >
> > # select * from bar order by city, date;
> >    city    | temp |        date
> > -----------+------+---------------------
> >  Austin    |   75 | 2010-02-21 15:00:00
> >  Austin    |   35 | 2010-02-23 15:00:00
> >  Edinburgh |   42 | 2010-02-23 15:00:00
> >  New York  |   56 | 2010-02-23 15:00:00
> >  New York  |   78 | 2010-06-23 15:00:00
> > (5 rows)
> >
> > If you want the highest recorded temperature for a city, that's easy
> > to do, since the selection criteria works on the same column that we
> > are extracing:
> >
> > # select city, max(temp) from bar group by city order by 1;
> >    city    | max
> > -----------+-----
> >  Austin    |  75
> >  Edinburgh |  42
> >  New York  |  78
> > (3 rows)
> >
> >
> > However there is (AFAIK) no simple way in plain SQL to write a query
> > that performs such an aggregation where the aggregation criteria is
> on
> > one column and you want to return another, e.g. adding the the *date
> > of* that highest temperature to the output above, or doing a query to
> > get the most recent temperature reading for each city.
> >
> > What I'd like to do is something like the below (and I'm inventing
> > mock syntax here, the following is not valid SQL):
> >
> > -- Ugly implicit syntax but no worse than an Oracle outer join ;-)
> > select city, temp, date from bar where date=max(date) group by city,
> > temp order by city;
> >
> > or perhaps
> >
> > -- More explicit
> > select aggregate_using(max(date), city, temp, date) from bar group by
> > city, temp order by city;
> >
> > Both of the above, if they existed, would be a single data access
> > followed by and sort-merge.
> >
> > The only way I know how to do it involves doing two accesses to the
> > data, e.g.
> >
> > # select city, temp, date from bar a where date=(select max(b.date)
> > from bar b where a.city=b.city) order by 1;
> >    city    | temp |        date
> > -----------+------+---------------------
> >  Austin    |   35 | 2010-02-23 15:00:00
> >  Edinburgh |   42 | 2010-02-23 15:00:00
> >  New York  |   78 | 2010-06-23 15:00:00
> > (3 rows)
> >
> >
> > # explain select * from bar a where date=(select max(b.date) from bar
> > b where a.city=b.city) order by 1;
> >                                 QUERY PLAN
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
> > ---
> >  Sort  (cost=1658.86..1658.87 rows=1 width=528)
> >    Sort Key: a.city
> >    ->  Seq Scan on bar a  (cost=0.00..1658.85 rows=1 width=528)
> >          Filter: (date = (subplan))
> >          SubPlan
> >            ->  Aggregate  (cost=11.76..11.77 rows=1 width=8)
> >                  ->  Seq Scan on bar b  (cost=0.00..11.75 rows=1
> > width=8)     -- would be an index lookup in a real scenario
> >                        Filter: (($0)::text = (city)::text)
> > (8 rows)
> >
> > --
> > Sent via pgsql-performance mailing list (pgsql-
> > performance(at)postgresql(dot)org)
> > To make changes to your subscription:
> > http://www.postgresql.org/mailpref/pgsql-performance
> 
> 
> 
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Next:From: Dave CrookeDate: 2010-02-24 22:47:54
Subject: Re: Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy
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Subject: Re: Extracting superlatives - SQL design philosophy

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